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Inside/Outside the Ivory Tower

Walker, Jill. “Blogging from Inside the Ivory Tower.” Uses of Blogs. Ed. Axel Bruns and Joanne Jacobs. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2006. 127 – 137. Print.

In this chapter, Walker talks about her own ambivalence blogging now that she has a position invested in the hierarchy of academic life. As academia is steeped in a reliance upon hierarchy, blogging creates a tension, as part of its appeal is that it is non-hierarchical and open to anyone who wishes to create an (usually free) account. She notes the type of people who keep scholarly blogs, and also that those who comment critically and/or humorously on academia also blog under anonymous pseudonyms.

Scholarly Blogging

Halavais, Alexander. “Scholarly Blogging: Moving Toward the Visible College.” Uses of Blogs. Ed. Axel Bruns and Joanne Jacobs. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2006. 117 – 126. Print.

This chapter outlines the rise of scholarly blogging and offers the four belief common to bloggers. Halavais suggests that the blog replaces the notebook for scholars and allows them to communicate with and reach the two audiences they need – other scholars and the general public – with a medium that is both professional and personal at the same time.

Blogging Literacies

Burgess, Jean. “Blogging to Learn, Learning to Blog.” Uses of Blogs. Ed. Axel Bruns and Joanne Jacobs. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2006. 104 – 114. Print.

This chapter discusses the author’s experience with two groups of students keeping blogs for academic purposes in her class. She introduces the three types of literacy that can be gained using blogs – critical, creative, and network – as developed by her collaboration with Jude Smith, Ross Daniels, and Axel Bruns; she attributes the addition of network literacy was inspired by Jill Walker.